perception

Perception controls belief

I promised myself that I would start my day writing my new course. At the start of the day I often feel inspired, that’s when my best ideas just flow into my mind and I know that if I don’t get them down on paper, they often go to the graveyard of great ideas from which there is no return. Then I received a message from my assistant saying she wouldn’t be in, so, I decided I had better check emails first and that’s when inspiration died. Three hours later I had handled most of the urgent matters but it was too late. Inspiration had been pushed aside by the practical mundane details associated with running a business.

This has been the story of my life for the past two years. I wrote my first book before and during pregnancy when my mind was not at its clearest. I have written books with a baby and very young child to look after, so what happened? The difference between then and now is that I allocated a specific time where there would be no interruptions. When I wrote my first book I spent one day a week out of the office that was dedicated to writing. When my daughter was young I only ever attempted writing at times when she was in care, or asleep. It did help that in those days there was no such thing as email.

I know that to achieve my writing goals I need to allocate set  writing hours as I did in the past. So, what’s stopping me? Normally I would say time, but I am starting to question if that is really true. More than likely it my perception of not having enough time that is preventing me from doing something I love.

Most of us get caught in the trap of believing that are thoughts are true. Our perception becomes hardwired into our brains and our perception controls our beliefs, but that doesn’t mean that our perception is accurate. When I looked at times I could write I found several times I could allocate that would not damage my business, but I was so locked into my belief ‘that there is never enough time to do the things I want to do’, I didn’t plan ahead.

Recently in my life coaching class I coached a student who often felt overwhelmed and had trouble getting things done, like many people she had a tendency to procrastinate. She said she was a proficient list maker, but her lists were never ending and she never ticked all of the items off her list. As I asked questions as to what was on her list it became clear to me that it wasn’t the volume of things she had to do that caused her to procrastinate, it was that she didn’t want to do them. As she answered more questions it became evident that she really valued freedom and her perception that she had so much to do was what made her feel overwhelmed.

Most people try to change their life by changing habits, and that can definitely help, but when we get to the root cause of what is holding us back we can break patterns of behaviour permanently. And finding ways to fill our most important needs is sometimes all we need to do to resolves the issue.

To change habits we need to live consciously, that means pausing every now and then and challenging our perception. According to Bruce Lipton, author of The Biology of Belief, “At best, 5% of the time the conscious mind runs our life”. That means that our subconscious programs are in charge.

My daily motto now is: Pause. Breathe. Reflect. Then where necessary challenge my assumptions. It’s such a simple strategy that can make a big difference to the quality of our lives.

 

 

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